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Posts tagged ‘char kway teow’

Sun Kwong, Whitfords Mall

Sun Kwong Menu, Reviews, Photos, Location and Info - Zomato

Sun Kwong is a shopping mall food counter that I have been happy to use for over ten years. I tend not to have the pre-cooked dishes that are kept warm, I like to order the ‘made-to-order’ dishes such as the noodle soups and the char kway teow. You pay for them in advance and get a numbered ticket, and within ten minutes you will be given a most delicious meal.

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I would say that the char kway teow is authentic, and the wanton noodle soup delicious and nourishing. The char kway teow is certainly as good as any that I have tasted in Malaysia and Singapore.

This the wanton noodle soup – great value – lots of wantons and noodles and a delicious broth full of veggies:

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They also provide chilli oil in a little pot if you prefer things a little hotter.

The staff are friendly and helpful, and the fridge has a plentiful supply of soft drinks.

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There is always a plentiful suply of dumplings, spring rolls and dishes ready to take away.

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I definitely recommend Sun Kwong for your lunch while you are shopping at Whitfords and your ‘go to’ place for your northern suburbs char kway teow fix.

 

Char kway teow

Char kway teow

Char kway teow

If you have leftover chicken or some veggies to use up, there’s nothing easier than char kway teow for a quick supper.

You will need some flat rice noodles (pad thai noodles) and some beansprouts – I tend to use the dry ones and allow 75g dry weight per person, but you can use the ready softened ones if you like.

1. Boil the kettle, and soak the dry noodles in a bowl in boiling hot water – they will take about 5 minutes to soften – test them regularly and drain them in a colander when they are done to your liking.

2. Peel and chop a clove of garlic, slice a small onion, and any other veggies that you may have handy – you can slice mushrooms, tomatoes, capsicum, chilli, carrot etc. most veggies will work as long as you slice them small enough to cook quickly.

3. If you have some leftover roast chicken, slice that too, you can also use prawns – I think that raw tiger prawns work best, each prawn chopped into 3 or 4 pieces. I also add sliced chinese sausage to mine, but you don’t have to if you can’t find any.

4. Heat some oil in a wok – use peanut or canola oil because they will not add flavour. Fry the onion and garlic for a few minutes, then add vegetables in order of hardness – harder veggies first (like carrot and capsicum), squishier veggies last (like tomato and beansprouts).

5. If you like it spicy, add a generous dollop of chilli paste while you are cooking the veggies.

6. Add the leftover chicken or prawns. Add two to three tablespoons of ketjap manis (thick sweet soya sauce), and a squeeze of lime. Now add the drained noodles and stir fry, coating the noodles in the sauce.

7. Garnish with some crispy onions. Nice.

 

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