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Chocolate Ginger Cookies

20190616_193530.jpgThis recipe is based on my peanut butter and chocolate chip cookies, they really are simple to make and taste very good. The ginger chunks add a nice dimension and they are based on my memories of M&S extremely chocolatey biscuits. You just need a food mixer, a hand held one is fine, and the ingredients are really straightforward.

Start off by lining a few baking trays with baking parchment – you will need 2 large or 3 small baking trays.

Set the oven to 190 deg C.

You need:

180g plain flour

half a teaspoon of baking powder

a pinch of salt

150g butter or dairy free spread e.g. Nuttelex

60g soft brown sugar (you can also use caster but brown sugar adds gooeyness)

1 teaspoon of vanilla essence

1 large egg

125g of chopped crystallised ginger (or the uncrystallised naked ginger works well) I use Buderim ginger, but please don’t use raw ginger – it’s not the same!

Optional: you can also include a handful of chocolate chips to the dry mix and a scoop of Nutella or peanut butter to the wet mix if you want an extra richness,

For the coating – approx 200g chocolate of your choice – I like dark 70-80% cocoa

1. Mix the dry ingredients together in a bowl – flour, baking soda and salt. Add the ginger chunks (and choc chips if using them). Stir well.

2. Beat the sugar and butter together using the food mixer. If including a scoop of peanut butter or Nutella, wait until it is nicely combined and fluffy then add the Nutella/peanut butter and whisk again.

3. Now beat in the egg and vanilla, it may curdle a little but don’t worry the flour will sort that out.

4. Now mix in the dry ingredients and beat again – the dough should stiffen up quite a bit and you may need to add a little water to soften it, but don’t add too much because it needs to hold together on the baking tray. It should be a kind of plasticine consistency so that you can shape it into balls.

5. Now take a dessert spoon of mixture and roll it into a ball. If it sticks to your hands, just wet your hands a little. Put all of the balls on the baking trays to make sure that they are roughly equal in size, then press them either with fingers or the base of a glass, squashing them into round biscuit shapes. Keep a few centimetres distance between each biscuit because they will spread out. You should get around 12-14 cookies.

6. Bake for approx 12-15 minutes until they are slightly golden and still a little soft in the middle.

7. Once they are cool, melt the chocolate over a double boiler (or in a bowl over a saucepan of gently simmering water – if you do this the bowl must fit tightly and not touch the water).

8. Either pour some of the melted chocolate over the biscuits or dip them half into the molten chocolate, then place on baking parchment to set. Put them in the fridge to speed up the setting. Don’t forget to taste one just to check they are ready.

 

Simple overnight oats

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Overnight oats are so quick and easy to prepare and very adaptable to suit your own preferences. You can use any milk or combination of milks that you like, any fruits, you can add flavourings and sweeteners to suit your diet.

All of my overnight oats start with a basic recipe of half a cup of breakfast oats (this is one serve). Oats are relatively gluten free but they can contain traces because they tend to be manufactured in the same places as gluten cereals. If you are really allergic then buy gluten free oats. I then add approx 1 cup of milk. I tend to mix soy and almond milk, but you can use any milk – cow, goat, rice, coconut etc. You can also add yoghurt for a thicker consistency. I add a teaspoon of chia seeds – you can add more if you wish, but chia can be calorie rich so keep an eye on what you are adding.

I then add something to spice it up a bit like cinnamon or mixed spice. Give it a good stir because cinnamon doesn’t really dissolve in the milk. You can also add any supplements like whey protein, spirulina etc., seeds, or dried fruits like dates, apricots, sultanas, mixed peel.

My next addition to the pot is two types of chopped, sliced, or grated fruit. My favourites are grated apple (wonderful with cinnamon), pear, fresh raspberries, strawberries, blueberries, white peach and banana but you can use any fruits you like. The berries tend to be lower in calories than other fruits.

If you prefer sweetener, add a little sugar or some maple syrup, agave syrup or honey, but it really shouldn’t need any. Give everything a good stir, make sure the chia hasn’t clumped, and make sure that the oats are coated in the milk.

You can make a huge portion in a bowl and store it in the fridge, but I prefer to make individual portions in mason jars. Leave them in the fridge overnight and then they are ready to serve in the morning. I eat mine cold, but you can warm it up in a microwave or saucepan if you prefer. Couldn’t be easier.

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Versatile vegetable sauces for pasta etc.

I like to make pasta sauces in advance – they are a great way of using up leftover vegetables, and can be really economic to make if you have a supermarket that offers misshapen or odd veggies at a lower price e.g. The Odd Bunch. If you have children, they won’t notice how many veggies are in the sauce because it will taste so good and also be very nutritious. My sauces tend to be red or green and both go really well with pasta. The red sauce is tomato based and great for meatballs (or Bolognese if you add mince to it), but it is equally nice on its own. The green sauce goes really nicely with fish and pasta, I tend to add some cooked salmon or crab to the green sauce and serve it with a nice penne or fusilli pasta.

 

20190106_171108.jpgFOR THE RED SAUCE

2 stalks of celery chopped (leftover celery freezes really well, chop it up and place portions into zip seal bags)

1 onion chopped

2 cloves of garlic chopped

1 fresh red chilli chopped (or a teaspoon of chilli paste)

1 jar of passata

2 teaspoons of vegetable stock powder

Mixed herbs (dried, fresh or in a tube) – use whichever herbs you like, I used a large teaspoon of mixed dried herbs

Salt and pepper to season

Optional: tomato paste, sun dried tomatoes, capers, olives, roasted capsicum in a jar – this is great for using up all of those half used jars in the fridge.

Any veggies, for the sauce in the picture I used: 1 zucchini, 1 sweet potato, 3 large mushrooms, and half a red capsicum. You can also use eggplant, squash, carrots, cauliflower, swede, fresh tomatoes – anything that you have lying around will work. Chop all of the veggies into small pieces and keep the hard veg separate from the softer veg as it will take longer to cook.

METHOD

Using approx 2-3 tablespoons of oil (olive or vegetable), fry the onion, celery, chilli and garlic for a minute.

Add the hard vegetables e.g. carrot, swede, sweet potato, zucchini, squash.

After approx 5 minutes, add the soft vegetables and the passata. Add the herbs, vegetable stock powder and seasonings and continue to cook until all of the vegetables are soft and a little mushy.

Using a stick blender or food processor, whizz up the vegetables into a smooth sauce. When dividing portions for the freezer, 500ml of sauce is a good portion size for two people. Taste and adjust the seasoning to suit your taste.

FOR THE GREEN SAUCE

2 stalks of celery chopped (leftover celery freezes really well, chop it up and place portions into zip seal bags)

1 onion chopped

2 cloves of garlic chopped

2 teaspoons of vegetable stock powder

3 tablespoons of yoghurt, coconut cream, cashew cream, sour cream, ricotta or coconut yoghurt

Mixed herbs (dried, fresh or in a tube) – use whichever herbs you like, I used a large teaspoon of mixed dried herbs

Salt and pepper to season

Any green veggies, for the sauce in the picture I used: 1 zucchini, 1 head of broccoli, 1 large mushroom (okay it’s not green but I wanted to use it up), and a bunch of broccolini. You can also use kale, spinach, swede, green capsicum, yellow capsicum, cauliflower, green cabbage – again, anything that you have lying around that is predominantly green or yellow will work. Chop all of the veggies into small pieces and keep the hard veg separate from the softer veg as it will take longer to cook. You can also use any edible stems and leaves, just chop the stems a bit smaller e.g. broccoli stems.

METHOD

Using approx 2-3 tablespoons of oil (olive or vegetable), fry the onion, celery, chilli and garlic for a minute.

Add the hard vegetables e.g. zucchini, swede, broccoli.

After approx 5 minutes, add the soft vegetables. Add the herbs, vegetable stock powder and seasonings and continue to cook until all of the vegetables are soft and a little mushy.

Add the yoghurt, cream or ricotta. You may also need to add some water if the consistency is too thick.

Using a stick blender or food processor, whizz up the vegetables into a smooth sauce. When dividing portions for the freezer, 500ml of sauce is a good portion size for two people. Taste and adjust the seasoning to suit your taste.

If you wish to cook crab pasta for example, heat the sauce, prepare the pasta in a separate pot. When the pasta is almost cooked add approx 100g of cooked crab per person to the sauce, heat through for a few minutes, then drain the pasta and combine the sauce with the pasta.

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Home made meatballs

Home made meatballs are so versatile and freezable, and once made ahead they are perfect for a quick midweek dinner with some pasta sauce and pasta, and the best thing is that if you make them yourself, you know exactly what goes into them. If you need gluten free or dairy free meatballs, beware of buying them in a supermarket because some manufacturers add milk, flour, and gluten containing breadcrumbs.

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Here’s the recipe that we use, and this quantity makes approximately 40 meatballs. We portion them up for the freezer by wrapping 8 in cling film and then placing them in a zip seal bag. We get 4 dinners out of approx 1 kg of meat, so that’s 125g of meat per person per meal which equates to 4 golf ball sized meatballs per person. If that’s too much or not enough for you, feel free to divide it up into larger portions or smaller portions to suit your family. If you want to be super swish you can weigh the finished mixture (makes sure you note the weight of the empty bowl first), then you can weigh each meatball to make sure they are even.

INGREDIENTS

1kg of minced meat (we vary ours but tend to mix two meats e.g. 500g of 5 star beef and 500g 3 star pork – this ensures that there is enough fat in them, but feel free to make them ‘leaner’ if you need, or use other minces such as turkey, chicken, veal, lamb etc.)

1 large onion, grated or whizzed up in a food processor (if you fry up the mashed onion first, this will release some of the water and make for a more manageable mixture, but you don’t have to).

2 slices of bread whizzed up into breadcrumbs (we prefer wholemeal, you can also use gluten free bread)

1 egg, beaten

2 teaspoons of your favourite mustard – Dijon is a good choice

2 teaspoons of vegetable stock powder

Some herbs – dried mixed, minced in a tube, or fresh chopped such as parsley, basil etc.

Salt and pepper – approx half a teaspoon of each

Optional extras – if you want a spicier meatball you can add chilli, paprika, cumin, coriander, turmeric.  If you can eat dairy, you can also add grated parmesan to the mixture. You can also add a dash of nutmeg or some tomato paste if you like a tomatoey flavour.

METHOD

Mix everything together in a large bowl until all of the ingredients are nicely combined then shape into golf ball size balls.

COOKING

When you are ready to cook them, brown them in a little oil first in a frying pan, then add the sauce of your choice. Start your pasta cooking in a separate pot, and by the time the pasta is cooked (approx 12 minutes), the meatballs should be cooked through. Cut one in half to make sure. Obviously larger meatballs will take longer. Garnish with parmesan and black pepper (you can also buy good vegan parmesan if you prefer dairy-free).

 

Raspberry and white chocolate loaf cake

Raspberries and white chocolate make a great combination, and a loaf cake is easy to prepare and slice. This lovely light and slightly gooey cake is a sweet summer treat.

I have suggested a few things to reduce the dairy, but you really can’t remove it completely unless you use dark chocolate instead (which works equally well with raspberries).

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If you are going for the reduced dairy version, first make your own buttermilk by adding a tablespoon of lemon juice to three quarters of a cup of your favourite non-dairy milk e.g. almond milk, soy milk, coconut milk. Leave it for ten minutes until it curdles.

Line a loaf tin with baking parchment and set the oven to 180 deg C.

Take a punnet of raspberries (1 cup approx). Wash and pat them dry and dust them lightly with some flour.

Take approx 75g of fine white chocolate and break it into small pieces – they don’t have to be uniform in size, just smallish pieces about the same size as choc chips that you would get in a choc chip cookie.

Put the curdled ‘buttermilk’ in a large mixing bowl and add:
125 ml vegetable oil
2 eggs
1 teaspoon of vanilla

Whisk them all together with an electric whisk for a few minutes.

In another bowl combine:
One and a half cups of flour
three quarters of a cup of caster sugar
1 heaped teaspoon of baking powder
Half a teaspoon of salt

Fold the dry ingredients into the whisked wet ingredients.

Fold in the raspberries and white chocolate pieces. Pour the mixture into the lined loaf tin and tap the tin on the kitchen worktop to ensure that the mixture gets into the corners of the tin.

Bake for just longer than an hour until a skewer comes out mostly clean (there will be some gooey choc on the skewer).

20181105_195350Cool the cake by lifting it out of the tin. Once almost cool, melt approx 100g white chocolate in a double boiler (a bowl that fits tightly over a saucepan, with some water in the saucepan will work nicely too. Just make sure that the water does not touch the bottom of the bowl.)

Drizzle the melted chocolate over the top of the cake. Done !

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Bhuna Sauce

I made an epic prawn bhuna the other day and I’ve had a few people asking me for the recipe, so here it is.

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I make mine dairy free, so I use coconut yoghurt or coconut cream instead of usual yoghurt, but if you don’t mind dairy, feel free to use lovely thick Greek yoghurt. I also use fresh tomatoes because the produce here in Perth is outstanding, but feel free to use tinned tomatoes if you wish.

This is how I skin and prepare my tomatoes – it’s quick and easy and by the time you have chopped your onions and garlic, the tomatoes will be ready to peel. I boil the kettle, and with a sharp knife I cut a shallow cross in the top where the stem was and again on the opposite side. Then I place them in  bowl of boiling hot water for about 5-6 minutes.

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Be careful when you remove them because they’ll be hot. The skin should come away easily just by rubbing it slightly, if it doesn’t then they need a bit longer.

20181028_083338.jpg I also remove any thick inner stem and the fibrous part where it attached to the plant. For this recipe I also remove most of the watery seedy part so that the final product is chunks of skinless tomato flesh.

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This recipe is enough to serve 6 people, you can also freeze portions of sauce to use later then you can add fresh chicken or prawns on the day that you serve it.

You need:

a quarter of a teaspoon each of:
coriander seeds
cumin seeds
fennel seeds
black mustard seeds

2 onions (chop one and a half of them and puree the other half in a blender)
2 teaspoons of garlic (either crushed or pureed with the onion puree above)
2 teaspoons of fresh grated ginger (or from a tube if that’s more convenient)
4 large ripe tomatoes
1 teaspoon of turmeric powder
2 teaspoons of chilli paste (or 1 teaspoon of chilli powder)
4 teaspoons of medium curry powder (I use Clive of India but choose your favourite brand or make your own)
300mls of chicken or vegetable stock
2 generous heaped dessertspoons of Greek yoghurt or coconut yoghurt or approx (150-200ml coconut cream)
4 tablespoons of tomato puree
2 teaspoons of garam masala
oil – vegetable, groundnut or something else with a mild or no flavour
salt and pepper

  1. Get everything chopped, pureed and ready.
  2. Heat 3 tablespoons of oil in a large pan and add the whole seeds.20181028_08505320181028_085505
  3. Once you hear them pop and crackle, add the onions, ginger, and garlic and stir to coat them in the spicy mixture.20181028_085635
  4. Once the onions start to soften, add the turmeric, chilli, and curry powder.20181028_085927
  5. Give everything a good stir, cook for a few minutes, then add the tomatoes and tomato puree.20181028_092055
  6. Cover and cook for approximately 10 – 15 minutes then stir in the yoghurt and the garam masala. The garam masala will make the sauce take on a brown colour. Once the tomatoes and onions are soft and a bit mushy, turn the heat off and leave the sauce covered to cool down in the pot. Add salt and pepper to taste. If it’s too spicy, add a little sugar to balance the spices. Freeze in appropriate portion sizes.
  7. If using the same day, reheat the sauce and add the protein of your choice e.g. raw prawns, chicken, lamb, veggies and cook until the meat or veggies are cooked through. I used lovely fresh large raw jumbo tiger prawns and they were delicious.
  8. Bhuna tends to be quite a dry curry, so use as much sauce as you like that suits your needs. I prefer more gravy so I tend to be quite generous with the sauce. If you reheat it uncovered, you can reduce the sauce if you prefer a thicker, richer flavour.

 

Smoothie Bowls

Smoothie bowls are a great breakfast idea and they can be made up in advance. The possibilities are endless, but one of my favourite breakfast smoothies is a combination of frozen blueberries, frozen cherries, almond milk, soy milk and protein powder. I bulked this up a bit by adding some cooked quinoa and then topped it with sliced banana, chia, strawberries, dried apricots, almonds and a few chocolate nibs.

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To get the best smoothie bowls, you need to be a little bit organised at the start of the week. If using quinoa, wash and cook up a small amount and keep it in the fridge in a sealed container. Put some chia seeds in a jar and soak them – they should swell with the water and form a gel like slurry. The smoothie can be made up in advance but will probably need a stir in the morning, then all you need to do is add your toppings.

Frozen berries make a great smoothie base because you don’t have to add ice. You can use blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, cherries and some of the mixed berries too. Fresh berries are also good but don’t add the coldness to the smoothie.

You can use whatever milk you like and add yoghurt – thick greek yoghurt has a great protein content – and if you prefer not to add dairy you can use coconut yoghurt. For a bulkier smoothie you can add protein powder, quinoa, oats, psyllium husk and shredded coconut, and you can also soak cashews in water and whizz them up in the blender for a lovely cashew cream. I like to mix my milks so that I get a good fat/carb/protein mix.

Toppings can be fresh or tinned fruits – peaches, pears, apples, banana, strawberries, kiwi, lychees, pineapple.

You can also add nuts – if they are slightly toasted, that’s even better, and you can crush them too. You can also sprinkle desiccated coconut over the top.

Dried fruits make a great topping – sultanas, apricots, dates, figs.

Soaked chia is a nice addition, also agave syrup, maple syrup, honey and even a slight drizzle of nutella. Yum. Every bowl can be different, and they are fun to make.

Ricotta Pancakes

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I love a pancake, and I am always on the lookout for new pancake recipes. This one creates quite a thick batter and the amounts given are for one big one or two smaller ones. This one has no wheat flour, it is made with coconut flour and ricotta with some psyllium husk to make it light and fluffy. I topped mine with some frozen berries that I heated with a little water, a scoop of coconut yoghurt, honey and a sprinkle of granola.

Recipe – mix all the ingredients up in a jug or bowl:

60g ricotta
1 egg
1 dessertspoon of psyllium husk
1 dessertspoon of coconut flour
1 teaspoon of vanilla
1 dessertspoon of shredded coconut (optional)
a little water or soy milk

Heat a little oil in a frying pan (I use vegetable or groundnut oil), then scoop the batter into the pan (it will be too thick to pour). Smooth it out with a spatula and heat on low  to medium heat for approx 5 minutes before flipping over and cooking for another 5 minutes.

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It looks quite thick but the inside is soft and light. Topping options are endless including nutella, strawberries, peaches, nuts, honey, agave syrup, yoghurt, and cream.

 

 

Pickled Chillies

We grew some chillies over the summer months and were surprised at how huge the crop was. After making green masala paste, we decided to pickle some. This was our first try at pickling, so we bought some assorted jars. We had approx 250g of chillies to pickle. This recipe can be scaled up if you have more.

The first thing to do is sterilize the jars and lid with boiling water. Leave them with the boiling water in them while you wash the chillies. Trim the tops, leaving a little bit of the stalk if you like, and give them a good wash.

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Then prick each chilli along the length of the flesh around 4-8 times with a pin. This will allow the pickling liquid to soak in.

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Empty the boiling water from the jar(s). Next, you might need to use some tessellation skills, but pack the jars with chillies, trying to leave as few gaps as possible. We found that 250g chillies packed quite nicely into a 500ml jar.

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Now make the pickling liquid by combining

  • 125ml white vinegar
  • 125ml cold water
  • half a teaspoon of sugar
  • half a teaspoon of coriander seeds
  • half a teaspoon of black peppercorns
  • half a tablespoon of salt
  • 2 bay leaves

in a saucepan. Heat up the pickling liquid so that the salt and sugar dissolves, but don’t boil it.

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Now pour the pickling liquid into the jar, filling it right to the top so that the chillies are covered. If there isn’t enough liquid top up with some white vinegar and screw the lid on tightly. Leave the pickle in the fridge for a few weeks. After the first week check to make sure that all chillies are submerged and top up with vinegar as required.

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Chicken with chilli, ginger and mushrooms

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This is a Ken Hom recipe which I have adapted and every time I cook it, I get compliments from our guests. The original version does not use chilli, so you can leave it out if you want to, but I think it adds a nice dimension. The chunks of chicken in my picture are quite large but if you are feeding a  lot of people, make smaller chunks so that it cooks more quickly and evenly.

If you want to serve it with special fried rice as in the picture, make sure that you have some cold cooked rice available. This is then fried in a wok in a little oil with onion, frozen peas and egg approx 4-5 minutes before serving the chicken. Fry the onion first so that it is soft, add the peas so that they thaw, then either add a pre-cooked one egg omelette that has been chopped into small pieces, or cook a raw egg in the oil and break it up with the spatula before adding the rice. Toss the rice around in the wok to distribute the onion, egg and peas, and keep going until it is heated through.

Another bit of prep to do at least 30 minutes before cooking is to take the dried mushrooms, put them in a bowl or jug, and cover them with boiling water to give them time to reconstitute. You don’t have to use dried mushrooms, but if you do, you get a real depth of flavour and you can use the mushroom water to make the stock.

For the Chicken, ginger and mushroom you need (serves 2-4 people):

Chicken – thighs are more juicy, but you can use breast if you prefer, 100-200g per person should be plenty. This should be filleted and cut into 1 inch chunks.

Chicken marinade – this is enough for 2-4 servings:
Light soy sauce – 2 teaspoons
Shaoxing rice wine (or sherry) – 1 tablespoon
Sesame oil – 1 teaspoon
Cornflour – 2 teaspoons
Black pepper – approx half a teaspoon

Other ingredients:
Dried mushrooms – 25g – make sure these are soaked at least 30 mins ahead of cooking.
Fresh mushrooms (get a nice exotic mixture if you can – shiitake, cloud ears, brown) – 25g
Chilli – 1 small chilli of any variety – regular (or jalapeno if you are a chilli fan)
Ginger – must be fresh – 3 tablespoons peeled and cut into shreds
Garlic – 2 tablespoons peeled and chopped
Shallots or red onion – approx 4 tablespoons finely sliced – this equates to about half a red onion
Fish sauce – 1 tablespoon
Oyster sauce – 1 tablespoon
Sugar – 2 teaspoons
Chicken stock – 150mls – you can buy this ready made or make it up with the mushroom soaking water and a heaped teaspoon of good quality chicken stock powder
Groundnut oil – for cooking – probably a few tablespoons, I always guess mine
Salt and Pepper to taste
Fresh coriander and spring onion for a garnish – if you have some handy – this is optional

Method:
Things to do 30 minutes before cooking:

  1. Soak the dried mushrooms in water that you have just boiled in the kettle. They should be soft after about 30 minutes – leave them longer if not. Save the soaking water to make the stock (but remove any leftover bits from it by straining through a tea strainer). Remove the stalks and discard them, slice the mushrooms and set aside.
  2. If you haven’t got stock already made up, make up 150ml of chicken or vegetable stock by either a) using a stock cube or b) a heaped teaspoon of good stock powder with 150 – 200 mls of the mushroom water. Simmer in a little pan to dissolve all of the cube or powder and set aside. Bear in mind that some will evaporate so use more than 150mls of water and top it up if necessary.
  3. Marinate the chicken in 2 teaspoons of light soy, 1 tablespoon shaoxing rice wine, 1 teaspoon sesame oil and some salt and pepper. Ken Hom says to use one and half teaspoons of salt, but I leave the salt out because the soy is quite salty. I do add about half a teaspoon of pepper though. Once the liquid marinade is mixed through, add about 2 teaspoons of cornflour and mix again – this will make the coating thicker and cling to the chicken, give it a good mix so that it isn’t lumpy.
  4. Prep all the ingredients – peel and finely slice the ginger, garlic and shallots, slice the mushrooms. Slice the chilli and remove the seeds if you don’t like your food too spicy.

Cooking the chicken for the first time (this can be done in advance if you are prepping this for a busy dinner party):

  1. This first cooking gives the chicken the flavour of the ginger and chilli and also makes the ginger and chilli lovely and crispy to add another nice texture to the dish.
  2. Put approx 2-3 tablespoons of groundnut oil in a pan or wok and heat it until it is just smoking.
  3. Add the chilli and ginger and fry for a minute until crispy.20180330_180742.jpg
  4. Add the chicken and fry for another 4-5 minutes until almost cooked. The time will depend on how big the chunks are – if in doubt slice a piece to see if it is almost cooked through – if it is too pink, leave longer.20180330_18083820180330_181442
  5. Drain the chicken and reserve approx 1 tablespoon of the oil. Keep all of the crispy chilli and ginger pieces. If you are clever in the way that you do this, you shouldn’t have to clean the pan.

Putting it all together:

  1. Reheat the wok or pan with the remaining tablespoon of oil (don’t worry if you lost it all, just add another tablespoon of fresh oil).
  2. Add the shallots and garlic and fry for a minute to soften.
  3. Add the mushrooms (dried and fresh), and continue to stir fry and soften.20180330_181801
  4. Add the fish sauce, oyster sauce, stock and sugar. Return the chicken to the pan.20180330_181848
  5. Leave to simmer for 3-5 minutes to make sure that the chicken is cooked through.20180330_182228
  6. Taste the sauce and add salt and pepper to adjust seasoning if necessary.
  7. Serve with rice and garnish with fresh coriander and sliced spring onions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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