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Posts tagged ‘Beef’

Peking Spare Ribs

Chinese restaurants offer various varieties of spare ribs. Barbecue ribs seem to be the most popular, but you can also get the drier spiced salt ribs, ribs in plum sauce, or Peking spare ribs (sometimes called King Do). In restaurants the Peking ribs are usually coated in an orangey-brown sticky sauce and have a unique flavour of sweet and sour richness with a warm spicy background.

Peking spare ribs

The recipe for the ribs is fairly straightforward, but you need to plan ahead because they take a lot of marinating and cooking time. Whether you buy beef or pork ribs, get the best quality you can with a nice amount of meat on them.

Quantity – I served two racks of ribs between 6 people as an interim course between starter and main. It looked like quite a lot of ribs and was a large serving, but they all disappeared fairly quickly. If your ribs are long you can chop them in half with a meat cleaver to get extra portions. As a starter you should probably allow 2-3 ribs per person.

Wash your ribs before marinating, pat them dry with kitchen paper, and divide them up so that they are easier to manage.

Marinade recipe (enough for two racks):

250mls vegetable stock (either from stock cubes, powder, a carton or freshly made)

5 tablespoons of brown sugar

half a teaspoon of five spice powder

4 cloves of garlic, minced or grated

1 teaspoon of finely grated ginger

4 tablespoons of light soy sauce

2 cups of tomato ketchup (I used Heinz)

2 tablespoons of Hoisin sauce

1 tablespoon of rice wine vinegar

60-80mls red wine (optional)

Mix all of the marinade ingredients together in a large bowl and marinate the ribs  for at least 24 hours, I marinated mine for 2 days in the fridge, the bowl covered with cling wrap.

The next stage is to boil them. You don’t have to do this but it really makes them tender, so I definitely advise it. Pour the ribs and marinade into a large covered saucepan and bring them to the boil, then simmer them for 15-20 minutes.

Next prepare a large baking tray – for ease of cleaning I lined mine with foil and then placed baking parchment on top of the foil – this avoids the result of gooey bakeware which needs soaking to remove the sticky residue.

Place the ribs in the tray, make sure that each one is coated with marinade but not swimming in it. Loosely cover the tray with foil and roast in a preheated oven at 180-190 deg C for 70-90 minutes. The longer you cook them the more tender they will be. The meat should fall away from the bone quite easily.

Add honey to the remaining marinade (I added about 6 tablespoons) and baste them with fresh marinade about every 15 minutes during roasting. You can remove the foil cover 15 mins before the end of cooking. Once they are done, you may wish to garnish them with sesame seeds and chopped spring onion before serving.

Serve with good wine and good company.

Stir fried black bean beef

I made this dish after being totally inspired by the black bean beef dish served by Peach Garden at Singapore’s Changi airport (terminal 1). This simple dish was possibly the best meal at an airport that I have ever tasted, and I came home ready to make my own version.

Beef in black bean sauce

Beef in black bean sauce

I added mushrooms to my version and used both red and green capsicum peppers. It wasn’t quite as perfect as the Peach Garden version, but it was definitely very very tasty and I will be making it again. The dish is very quick to make once that you have your prep done, so get everything ready first, make sure your rice is nearly ready, and then create your lovely beef dish. I have tried to keep the salt to a minimum because the light soy and the black bean sauce will have salt in them already – but please taste before serving and adjust the seasoning.

This recipe serves two with lots of nice sauce:

Approx 250 – 300g of good rump steak trimmed and cut into thin strips (I bought a 350g pack, but trimmed all of the fat off)

Half a tablespoon of cornflour

1 tablespoon of shao xing rice wine (widely available in asian shops, but you can substitute with sherry)

1 tablespoon of light soy sauce

Half a large red capsicum

Half a large green capsicum

One medium onion

2-3 large brown mushrooms

2 garlic cloves

4cm root ginger grated

4 tablespoons black bean sauce

2 teaspoons sugar (preferably brown)

80mls chicken stock (try to use low salt variety)

Half a teaspoon of sesame oil

1. Mix together the cornflour, shao xing rice wine and light soy sauce in a bowl. Marinate the beef in this mixture for at least 10 minutes, but up to half an hour if you are organised.

2. Cut the onion and capsicums into bite sized chunks. Slice the mushrooms.

3. Make the sauce by mixing the stock, sesame oil, black bean sauce and sugar.

4. Fry the beef quickly in a few tablespoons of peanut or sunflower oil to brown it – just a few minutes. Remove the beef and keep it nearby on a plate.

5. Now put the onion, garlic, and ginger in the pan and stir fry for a few minutes. Add the capsisums and mushrooms and continue to stir fry over a fairly high heat for another 4-5 minutes.

6. Now add the sauce and the beef to the pan and stir fry for a further 3 minutes to heat through. Season to taste.

7. Serve with boiled or fried rice. You can garnish the beef with sliced spring onions if you like.

Vietnamese Beef Skewers

One of my favourite dishes in Viet Hoa is the beef skewers with wine and herbs. It took me a while to find a marinade that recreated them perfectly, but here it is:

Recipe

750g beef fillet

3 cloves garlic crushed

1 stalk lemon grass

1 small red chilli finely chopped

1 teaspoon caster sugar (brown is better)

1 tablespoon fish sauce (get vietnamese nuoc mam if you can)

2 teaspoons rice wine vinegar

1 tablespoon soy sauce

1 teaspoon sesame oil

Put the beef in the freezer while you make the marinade.

You can chop the lemon grass if you like, but I prefer to slice the very end off, so you can see the white middle, and cut long slits down the length of the stalk, but leaving about an inch intact at the top. Then you can bash the bulbous bottom end with a mallet or a flat heavy knife to release the flavour, but the stalk remains in one piece that you can remove it easily at the end of marinading or cooking.

Mix all of the marinade ingredients together in a large bowl.

Slice the beef very thinly and marinate for at least 4 hours, but preferably overnight (cover the bowl with cling film).

Thread the beef onto skewers and cook on a hot barbecue or griddle. If you like you can sprinkle them with sesame seeds before cooking, and serve with coriander leaves.

Enjoy.

The Best Satay

There are many satay recipes around and it is difficult to find a really authentic one, so I have decided to share my favourite satay recipe. These skewers taste lovely, especially if you cook them on the barbecue. The recipe takes time, and you need to allow time for marinating, but the end result is well worth it.

If you are a busy person and you look at my recipe and think “blimey, I can’t do all that”, then make your way to Mr Weezee – he has two shops, one at Booragoon and one on Stirling Highway. Satay is his speciality – he supplies most of the restaurants in Perth, and you can buy chicken or beef satay either on sticks (12 sticks for $10) or as a pack of meat, fresh or frozen along with a pot of satay sauce. It is one of those things that I always keep in the freezer now for a good tasty dinner in super quick time. With the packs of meat, you just stir fry them with your favourite veggies. Here’s a tip, if you decide to make the trip to Mr Weezee on Stirling Highway, there is a wonderful cafe next door called Elixir.

Okay so here is the recipe – you will need a device to grind some ingredients to a paste. I have a Braun Multiquick, but there are plenty of other similar utensils.

Satay Recipe

1.5 Kg meat (beef or chicken work best)

Grind the following to a paste:

6 stalks of lemon grass (remove the fibrous outer layers – just use the white middles)

10 shallots or 2 red onions

4 cloves garlic

1cm galangal (use an extra cm ginger if you can’t get galangal)

1cm ginger

1.5 tablespoons turmeric

2 tablespoons caster sugar (brown if you have it)

1 teaspoon salt

Chop the meat into thin strips (you can do chunks if you prefer, but they will take longer to cook) and marinate in the paste in the refrigerator overnight. Make sure you mix it well so that the marinade really penetrates the meat.

Soak some bamboo skewers in water (this stops them from burning), then thread the strips of meat onto the skewers like thick ribbons.

Cook on a barbecue or under a hot grill – the timing depends on how thick your chunks of meat are, after a few minutes cut one of the pieces of meat to see how it is doing. Serve with satay sauce (see below), cucumber, onion and rice.

Satay Sauce Recipe

Grind the following ingredients to a paste:

4 stalks of lemon grass (again, discard the fibrous outer layers, just use the soft white inner core)

1 cm galangal (if you can’t find galangal just use an extra cm ginger)

1cm ginger

1 teaspoon cumin seeds

1 tablespoon coriander seeds

1 tablespoon chilli paste (this is usually sufficient – add more or less depending on your taste)

You also need:

4 tablespoons vegetable oil

300g toasted peanuts coarsely ground

1 cup water

a quarter of a cup of thick tamarind juice (you can buy this in jars in asian supermarkets, but if you really can’t find it use lemon juice to add sourness to the sauce)

2 tablespoons sugar

palm sugar or honey if you need it to be sweeter

salt to taste

Heat the oil in a pot and fry the paste until it smells fragrant. Add all the other ingredients and cook until thick. Taste it as you go and add more salt, sugar,and  tamarind if necessary to season to your taste.

ENJOY

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